Tag Archives: education

Harris County Department of Education Awarded Head Start Grant

Funding Will Serve More than 1,200 Houston Children Daily

Congressman Gene Green announced that the Harris County Department of Education would receive a $6 million Head Start continuation grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

“Children and families that participate in Head Start receive countless benefits that appear quickly and are long lasting,” said Rep. Gene Green. “This grant will ensure that Head Start keeps changing the lives of children and parents in our community through education. I applaud the award and will continue to fight for education initiatives and programs that open opportunities regardless of where you start.”

Head Start provides early, continuous, intensive, and comprehensive child development and family support services to low-income infants, toddlers, pre-school children and their families, and pregnant women and their families. Head Start children have a higher likelihood of graduating high school, attending college, and receiving a post-secondary degree, license, or certification (Bauer and Schanzenbach, 2016). 

  • View Head Start fact sheets to learn more about demographics, state allocations, program statistics, and general information on Head Start enrollment history.
  • View Harris County Department of Education’s Head Start FAQ page.

 

East End Street Fest to Launch an Educational Program for Low-Income Students

The Navigation Esplanade will once again host the East End Street Fest to be held October 15th, 2016 from Noon to 10:00pm. This year’s highlight will be the implementation of an educational program for local students interested in the entertainment and arts industries.

Houston’s East End is known for its colorful art expressions and rich Latino history. The average household income in the area is $47,000 and only 9.5% of those living in the neighborhood hold a college degree or higher. Most students cannot afford more than $2,000.00 to travel and attend national entertainment conferences and festivals such as South By Southwest in Austin, Texas. To address this issue, the East End Street Fest committee will introduce an educational program for high school and college students interested in careers in Entertainment, Media, and Arts.

The educational program will be held at Talento Bilingue de Houston on October 15 between 10:00am and 2:00pm. The goal is to nurture the next generation of creative minds in the East End community and also work with local universities and community colleges to allow participating students to receive academic credit.

East End Street Fest committee members hope that this initiative will make the East End a national destination to discover emerging Latino talent and to cultivate the next generation of entertainment and media professionals.

The East End Street Festival 2016 will open its doors to the public at noon with a music lineup that includes national, regional and local music artists such as the psychedelic music band from California, Chicano Batman and the Texas Latino rising star, AJ Castillo. Other rock, Tejano, cumbia, electronic and indie music artists include La Diferenzia and their legendary Tejano style, El Dusty with his revolutionary cumbia-electronic music and Atlanta’s Xavier BLK with his high energy underground party music and many other local music artists.

Admission to the East End Street Fest is FREE for kids 12 and under. Adults can purchase their tickets for $10.00 online ($12 at the gate). The location is the East End Esplanade at 2600 Navigation. The time is 12:00 pm to 10:00 pm. For volunteer, vendor or sponsorship opportunities visit www.eastendstreetfest.com or call, 713.926.3305. Some of the event proceeds will benefit the Houston Firefighters Association.

Scholarship Application Deadline January 2015!

HACER

Apply to the RMHC®/HACER® Scholarship

 

As part of its mission of providing the highest quality educational opportunities to high-need Latino youth, the LULAC National Educational Service Centers, Inc. (LNESC) is partnering with McDonald’s® to help promote the RMHC®/HACER® Scholarship to qualifying high school seniors across the U.S. 

The RMHC/HACER Scholarship was founded to assist Hispanic high school students pursuing a college education. To date, RMHC has awarded more than $24 million in scholarships to outstanding Hispanic students. 

In 2008, the national scholarship was added, offering four $100,000 awards to Hispanic high school seniors, who are selected based on demonstrated academic achievement, financial need and community involvement. 

The RMHC/HACER Scholarship is awarded on a regional and national level, and awards range from $1,000 to $100,000. Applications for the 2015 RMHC/HACER Scholarship will be accepted from October 1, 2014 through January 20, 2015.

 

General Eligibility Requirements

  • Be a high school senior
  • Be younger than 21 years old
  • Have at least one parent of Hispanic/Latino heritage
  • Be eligible to attend a two- or four-year college, university or technical school with a full course of study
  • Be a legal U.S. resident
  • Live in a participating RMHC Chapter’s geographic area (for local/regional scholarships)
  • Submit a complete application and all required documentation by January 20, including:
    • Letters of recommendation
    • List of community service projects
    • Academic transcript
    • Personal essay highlighting academic, career, and personal goals

For more details, please visit www.rmhc.org or www.MeEncanta.com.

Unmet Need for Afterschool Programs in Hispanic Community Is ‘Large and Growing’

afterschool alliance

 

Participation in afterschool programs among Hispanic children and youth has increased significantly, from 15 percent in 2004 to 29 percent (or 3.8 million children) in 2014, according to a new household survey commissioned by the Afterschool Alliance. The 2014 edition of America After 3PM also finds that the unmet demand for afterschool is even higher: 57 percent of Hispanic students – 5.5 million children and youth – who are not already in programs would be enrolled if a program were available, their parents say. Hispanic parents strongly support afterschool programs and recognize tremendous benefits from participation.

The new survey spans 30,000 U.S. households and includes in-depth responses from 13,709 families, including 1,094 Hispanic families. It finds that 10.2 million U.S. children now participate in afterschool programs, up from 6.5 million in 2004. But the unmet demand for afterschool nationwide has increased to 19.4 million children. Demand is especially high among Hispanic, African American and low-income families.

“The country is nowhere close to meeting the demand for afterschool. In fact, the unmet demand for afterschool programs among Hispanic children is large and growing,” said Afterschool Alliance Executive Director Jodi Grant. “It’s clear that Hispanic families value afterschool programs, because they keep children safe, inspire them to learn, help working families, and promote healthy habits. But our public policies are shortchanging millions of children of all races and ethnicities, leaving them without the programs they want and need. Federal funding for afterschool programs has been stalled for years. We need to increase federal support for quality afterschool programs.”

“Due to the fact that most students come from homes where both parents are working, we have a duty to provide safe havens for our children during the crucial hours from 3 to 6 pm,” said former California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, founder of After-School All-Stars. “Afterschool programs do remarkable things for our children, families and communities. Reams of data show it, and I’ve seen it in my own work. These programs help kids with homework,  teach them teamwork, engage them in community service, pair them with mentors, help them to  be physically fit, involve them in activities like rocketry and robotics, and much more. Afterschool is a wise investment but, unfortunately, we’re not investing nearly enough. America After 3PMshows that we are meeting only about one-third of the demand for afterschool programs. We need federal, state and local governments, philanthropies and businesses to step up and provide the resources that will put us on the path to making afterschool available to all.”

Other key findings from the 2014 survey include:

  • Demand for afterschool is greatest among Hispanic, African American, and low-income families.Participation in afterschool and unmet demand for afterschool are much higher among children from low-income households than those from higher-income households, and higher among Hispanic and African American children than white children. The parents of 57 percent of the nation’s Hispanic children not currently participating in afterschool programs would enroll their child, if a program were available, as would the parents of 60 percent of African American children not currently enrolled. The same is true of 35 percent of white children.
  • Hispanic parents say that afterschool programs are an essential source of support for working parents—giving them peace of mind when at work and helping them to keep their jobs.
  •          More than 3 in 4 Hispanic parents (76 percent) agree that afterschool programs help provide working parents peace of mind about their children while at work. Agreement jumps even higher—to 87 percent—among Hispanic parents with a child in an afterschool program.
  •          Seventy-three percent of Hispanic parents agree that afterschool programs help working parents keep their jobs. Among Hispanic parents with a child in an afterschool program, 85 percent agree.
  •          Nearly 9 in 10 Hispanic parents (89 percent) say that they are satisfied with their afterschool program overall. In addition, Hispanic parents are satisfied with the safety of the afterschool environment (87 percent), and their afterschool program’s quality of care (90 percent).
  •          More than 3 in 4 Hispanic parents (78 percent) agree that afterschool programs provide children with opportunities to be physically active.
  •          Seventy-three percent of Hispanic parents agree that afterschool programs can help excite children about learning, and agree that programs help children gain workforce skills, such as teamwork, leadership and critical thinking (also 73 percent).
  •          Seven in 10 Hispanic parents agree that participating in an afterschool program can help improve children’s behavior in school, and 67 percent agree that programs can help improve children’s school day attendance.
  • Hispanic parents face specific barriers in finding an afterschool program for their children.Hispanic parents were more likely than white parents to agree that a lack of available afterschool programs was a barrier to enrolling their child. In addition, the lack of a safe way to get to, and get home from, afterschool programs, and the cost of programs were also top responses by parents identifying barriers.
  • Hispanic parents with a child in an afterschool program are highly satisfied with their program, both overall and with specific program features.
  • Hispanic parents—including parents with children in afterschool and children not in an afterschool program—recognize the multitude of benefits children gain from participating in an afterschool program.
  • Hispanic parents strongly support public funding of afterschool programs. Overall, 84 percent of parents report that they favor public funding for afterschool programs, but among Hispanic parents, 87 percent support public funding for afterschool programs.

America After 3PM details afterschool program participation rates by race, ethnicity, gender and income, describes the types of activities afterschool programs offer, examines barriers to participation, reports on parental views of program quality, and more. It provides in-depth information on children who are unsupervised after school, as well as those who would be enrolled if an afterschool program were available to them. In addition to the national data, America After 3PM offers state-level data as well as a snapshot of national participation and demand for summer learning programs.  Summer and state-by-state results are available at www.afterschoolalliance.org.

Findings from America After 3PM are based on in-depth interviews with 13,709 households with children, completed by way of an online survey using a blend of national consumer panels. Shugoll Research collected and analyzed the data for America After 3PM.  In order to participate, respondents had to live in the United States and be the guardians of a school-age child living in their household.  The online interview took approximately 15 minutes to complete. All interviews were completed between February 28 and April 17, 2014.

America After 3 PM is funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The Wallace Foundation, the Ford Foundation and the Noyce Foundation, with additional support from the Heinz Endowments, The Robert Bowne Foundation and the Samueli Foundation.

Supporting First Generation College Students [#TTGPChat]

Join TTG+PARTNERS  for a Twitter conversation about:

“Supporting First-Generation Students in the College Classroom”

A #ttgpchat about the experiences of students who are the first in their family to go to college with:
Chelsea M. Jones, @IamFirstGen
Associate Director, Student Programs
Center for Student Opportunity + I’m First!
Dr Matthew Lynch, @lynch39083
Dean of School of Education, Psychology, & Interdeisciplinary Studies +
Associate Professor of Eduacation Virginia Union University.
And First Generation Student, Brenda Angulo, @Slemo5
Sophomore
Trinity Washington University (Washington, D.C.)

This conversation will examine the experiences and challenges facing first-generation students in college that go beyond academics.

We will explore:

  • How do first-generation students support one another at college?

  • Do first-generation students of color require different supports?

  • Do these students receive enough guidance from faculty, administration, and family to be academically successful?

  • How does the college ratings debate impact first-generation students’ experiences?

  • How will the new Parent PLUS Loan requirements impact first-generation students of color?

Follow the conversation on Twitter. Send in questions and comments using the hashtag #ttgpchat.

International Rubik’s Cube Competition at Rice University!

World-class “speedcubers” from the United States and around the world will gather at Rice University Oct. 18 for a World Cube Association-sanctioned Rubik’s Cube competition. Various styles of competition with the colorful cubes will lead up to the final rounds, which begin at 2 p.m. The fastest puzzle solvers will receive prizes. Presented by the Rice Cube Club at Rice’s Jones Graduate School of Business, the event is free and open to the public.

Who: More than 50 to 60 “speedcubers” — people who solve the puzzle as quickly as possible — from the U.S. and around the world.

What: Rubik’s Cube competition, hosted by the Rice Cube Club.

When: 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Oct. 18.

Where: Rice University, McNair Hall, Shell Auditorium, 6100 Main St.

This is the first such event to be hosted at Rice, according to Cory Thigpen, a Jones School MBA student and president of the Rice Cube Club.

For more information about the competition, including the schedule of events, visit www.cubingusa.com/RiceUniversity2014/index.php.

Library Helps Latinos and Others Digitize History

digital library

[Nicky Trasvina goes through old family photos. Photo by Andra Cernavskis]

On Saturday afternoon, Susan Goldstein, the City of San Francisco’s archivist, could be found in the San Francisco Public Library’s fifth floor DIGI Center, a room for digital archiving, pouring over old, print photos with Alejandra Palos, a woman ready to donate some of her father’s photos.

Manuel Palos,  an architectural sculptor,  worked on projects throughout the city including the restoration of the Legion of Honor’s eight mythological creature sculptures and the ornamentation on the Neiman Marcus building downtown.  Palos,  a Mexican immigrant, came to San Francisco in 1966 to work as a mold maker for the Palace of Fine Arts. Despite his lack of professional experience,  the lead sculptor recognized his talent and took him under his wing. Palos continued to worker as a mold maker while sculpting on the side. He eventually made enough money to take a three-week trip to Italy every year for 20 years to study sculpting and in 1984, he opened his own sculpting business, Manuel Palos Sculpture.

Now that her father is 78, Palos wants to document his life, which is why she seized on the opportunity to bring the collection of photos and documents to the DIGI Center, which ran a free-of-charge, drop-in event as part the San Francisco Latino Heritage Fair.

It was the first time the DIGI Center, which officially opened at the main branch in January, has hosted an event like this for the public at their new central location. The goal on Saturday was to help Latinos publicly document and digitize their family’s history in San Francisco.

“We are trying to do a lot more outreach about digitizing and making it a core library service,” Goldstein said as she held a black and white image of Palos with a classical human sculpture.

Those who work at the DIGI Center decided to open their services to the public during the afternoon portion of the fair, which also featured seminars on how to preserve old photographs and how to organize digital documents and photos.

Palos, who grew up in Bernal Heights, heard about the fair through the San Francisco Latino Historical Society, one of the groups that organized the day’s events. She became emotional while explaining the content of the photographs to Goldstein.

“I almost want to cry…I thought I just really needed to jump on this,” she said to Goldstein.

More at MissionLocal.org

Findings Give Hope to Plant Extract as Possible #Lupus Treatment

New findings by a biomedical engineer and his team at the University of Houston (UH) raise hope for a new class of drugs to treat lupus that may not include the long list of adverse risks and side effects often associated with current treatments for this disease.

Lupus, or systemic lupus erythematosus, is a progressive, degenerative disease in which the immune system turns against itself, attacking a person’s healthy tissue, cells and organs. Symptoms range from debilitating pain and fatigue to organ failure and a host of other impairments. An estimated 1.5 million Americans, and at least five million people worldwide, have a form of lupus.

Though there is no cure, a UH researcher and his team are actively working toward finding new treatments and, ultimately, a cure. Chandra Mohan, Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Endowed Professor of biomedical engineering in the UH Cullen College of Engineering, and his group’s latest work could lead to new, more natural therapeutics for lupus that use a plant-derived chemical. The promising findings were recently published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, the monthly journal of the American College of Rheumatology.

With only one drug specifically approved for the treatment of lupus in the past 50 years, lupus patients are commonly treated with steroids, a class of immunosuppressive drugs that delay the development and progression of the disease by suppressing the immune system. By suppressing the immune system in its entirety, however, this mode of treatment carries with it an increased risk of infections and other harmful side effects.

In this latest research, Mohan and his colleagues present new findings that detail the use of a synthetic, plant-derived compound – abbreviated CDDO – that was shown to effectively suppress the multiple steps of lupus development in murine models, including the onset of kidney disease.

One of the most common organs to be attacked by lupus is the kidney, manifesting in lupus nephritis. While this condition doesn’t affect all lupus sufferers, an estimated 40 percent of lupus patients develop it. Lupus nephritis, which causes inflammation of the kidneys and impairs their ability to effectively rid the body of waste products and other toxins, is the leading cause of lupus-related deaths and results in tens of thousands of hospitalizations per year.

“The development of lupus is a two-step reaction. First, the immune system develops antibodies that attack the body’s own DNA, then that activated immune system attacks the kidneys,” Mohan said. “We found that CDDO may block both of these steps.”

Mohan says there is much left to be discovered about CDDO, including how it works in suppressing the progression of lupus. The next step for this research is to confirm whether the CDDO compound suppresses the immune system across the board, or whether it simply suppresses the activation of the specific signaling pathways that lead to the development of lupus. To find this out, Mohan’s group will test it in the lab to see if they can mount the proper immune response. If not, Mohan says the compound likely could be suppressing the entire immune system, which is the current problem with using steroids to treat lupus. Even if the compound is shown to be generally immunosuppressive, however, it still may be a better treatment option than steroids for some patients.

 

More at www.uh.edu

Houston Latino Elected Officials & Community Leaders to Formally Endorse Davis, Van de Putte

Houston Latino elected officials and community leaders held a press conference at to formally endorse Senators Wendy Davis and Leticia Van dePutte and highlight the contrasts in this race. Houston Latino leaders will work to make sure that their communities know the clear difference between Davis and Van de Putte’s commitment to all Texas families by investing more in our schools to ensure that children are better prepared for the future, and Abbott and Patrick who will allow standardized tests on four year-olds and jeopardize the Texas Dream Act.

“GIVE IT AWAY” PROGRAM TO BENEFIT ABANDONED AND NEGLECTED LOCAL PETS

Forgotten Dogs Logo

 

Forgotten Dogs of the Fifth Ward has joined the Give It Away” program at Style Cycle where local individuals can bring gently used items to help support the services provided by Forgotten Dogs of the Fifth Ward.

Forgotten Dogs of the Fifth Ward is a non-profit organization on a mission to help abandoned and neglected pets in the impoverished area of the Fifth Ward. They have developed feeding routes throughout the Fifth Ward to prevent animal death due to starvation and malnutrition. They provide medical care and foster and adoptive services for the rescued pets. Many of the animals are found injured, ill and malnourished stray and abandoned on the streets.

 

Style Cycle provides the overhead, sorting, pricing, necessary sales preparation, and merchandising. They have many different outlets to turn non cash donations into much needed cash for local Houston charities.

“We must leverage what we can to make a difference in the community” Allison Cuvillier, owner of Style Cycle said.

To donate, just take your gently used clothing, accessories, housewares, artwork, and furniture to Style Cycle, which is located at 246 W. 19th Street, Houston, TX 77008, and fill out a simple form to get your tax deductible donation receipt. Questions can be referred to Allison Cuvillier by calling 281-888-9171.
Let them know that the items are for Forgotten Dogs of the Fifth Ward and when the items are sold, Forgotten Dogs will receive 25% of the sale price.

“Our company buddies up with Forgotten Dogs of the Fifth Ward so that we can help support their work. This is an on-going charity opportunity that we provide and there are other ways to support them. They function totally 100% on donations and volunteers” said Allison Cuvillier owner of Style-Cycle.

Forgotten Dogs of the Fifth Ward cares for and feeds all the animals they can. They offer animals in the Fifth Ward of Houston help by finding placement in a no kill rescue and assisting the residents of this area with pet food, medical care, and pet care as needed. www.forgottendogs.org

 

Style-Cycle is a fun Vintage Inspired Store on 19th Street in the Houston Heights! The business goal is to have good quality resale items, to keep them revolving in our society, and to provide a service for local charities to turn the donations they receive into cash they can use. The store is located at 246 W. 19th